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A baby Indian Rhino was rescued in the Kaziranga National Park

  • 29
  • 03
  • 2016

A baby rhinoceros has recently been rescued in the Kaziranga national park in northeast India. A member of the park’s anti-poaching team discovered the Rhino, who is less than a week old, struggling against the rushing river. Unfortunately, once the calf had been pulled from the river his problems continued and a thorough effort to locate the Rhino’s mother was unsuccessful.

With no mother to look after the baby Rhino veterinarian Dr. Panjit Basumatary and the animal rescue unit on scene took the calf to the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC), which regularly cares for rhinos, elephants, tigers, leopards and deer.
If his mother is not found soon, the baby will be placed into the care of the centre where he will be protected until he is strong enough to survive in the wild alone, anywhere from three to four years old. The baby Rhino was introduced to the rhinos living in the centre in an attempt to lessen the shock of his new environment and introduce him to his new house-mates.

The centre has an incredibly strong track record for looking after the Indian Rhino’s, they have treated a total of 33 rhino calves in the past and most recently saw success when three of their released orphans began breeding.

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There are five species of Rhino in the world and Indian rhino’s are often recognized due to their distinctive single horn and their thick, pebbled looking skin which resembles body armor. Their population is estimated to stand at more than 3,000, with the largest concentration, about 70 percent, living in the Kaziranga National Park.

The efforts from CWRC and the Kaziranga Park have resulted in Indian rhino’s being listed as “vulnerable” instead of “endangered” by the IUCN. However, the Rhinos are far from in the clear, in East Asia there is high demand for the Rhinos horn which is used in traditional Medicine and seen to have magical properties.

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