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Indonesia Could Be Future Leader In Producing Renewable Energy with Tofu

  • 04
  • 07
  • 2016

The distant Indonesian village of Kalisari has a trick up their sleeves to produce a renewable economical energy supply to power their homes – tofu.

Tofu, made from pressed curds of coagulated soy milk, is a popular Southeast Asian food commonly used in their cuisine.

Because of the nature of tofu production which requires a large amount of water for production and the addition of acidic acid, the water usually ends up in the drainage, thereby affecting rivers nearby.

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Now, it can be accessed through a flip of a switch as biogas, thanks to the 150 small tofu businesses that started this movement of converting wastewater from their production floors.

Waroh, a producer, told AFP, “The advantages are huge because we produce the gas with waste.” Now the villagers do not have to rely on tanks of gas or wood to power their stoves.

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It is also three times cheaper for the villagers to use the biogas they produce than to buy refillable LPG tanks, according to phys.org.

Indonesia is currently one of the world’s top emitters of greenhouse gases. With their desire to have a quarter of their energy come from renewable sources by 2025, the local government has stepped in to build bigger tanks for biogas. They hope the gas will soon power the village street lights.

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The potential of extending this renewable energy method across the country is huge since Indonesia has thousands and thousands of tofu producers. If spread throughout the country, more than 56,000 tons of fossil fuel could be replaced by biogas every year.

 

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