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Japan Breaks The Norm on Smartphones With a Robot

  • 09
  • 07
  • 2016

Forget the human secretary because now you can have a cute companion to answer your phone calls and send your e-mails – one who will never forget the tasks you give.

This bite-size robot, first of its kind, is called RoBoHon. Reaching only 19.5 cm and weighing 390 grams, this mini humanoid robot could replace your conventional smartphone.

It boasts of features like voice command, voice mail, text messages, a camera, apps, and would even sing and dance for your amusement.

The integrated AI makes it a perfect personal assistant. He greets you according to the time of the day, reminds you of upcoming calls, and will do his best to accomplish every task you give.

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To make it even more complete, it comes with a built-in laser projector which makes it possible for its users to project photos, videos, and maps onto a screen or wall.

Sharp Corp. is the company responsible for this creation. It’s safe to say they do not want to follow the conventional way smartphones are being used at the moment.

With this smartphone, you do not get the kind of functional screen that you find on conventional phones. The company’s excuse for this feature is that the phone will be able to talk to you, which would ultimately reduce the need for high-resolution screens.

Their first target country is none other than Japan. We could have guessed that, right?

The hot sale began on April 14, with a cost per unit of 198,000 yen plus tax (roughly $1820). The goal is to make and sell 5000 units per month.

How would you feel having a mini-robot hanging out of your pocket?

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