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Japanese sweet made from crystal sugar and egg yolk

  • 15
  • 05
  • 2016

Wondering what fine gift to give your loved ones? Here is the answer. Try Matsuyariemon Keiran Somen and you will not be disappointed.  This is a sweet whose only ingredients are crystal sugar and egg yolk. The simple ingredients are stretched into shiny delicious egg noodles. Matsuyariemon, Inc., which was founded over thirty decades ago, has been involved in the production of this amazing traditional sweet for thirteen generations now. The sweet originates from nanbangashi which means “sweets from foreign countries.” They were originally brought to Japan from Portugal in the 16th century.

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As if that was not good enough, the head of the company came up with the idea of cutting the noodles into bite-sized bits and wrapping these pieces with a kelp string to make them easy to eat and to transform them into a beautiful form, which would be suitable for a tea party. The Matsuyariemon Company named this form of the signature sweet the Keiran Somen Tabane. The sweet is improved by a finish of full fragrance and rich flavor, which makes it unique and highly exotic. Surprisingly, you do not need to dig too deep in your pocket to buy these sweets. A packet of eight sweets goes for 1620 Japanese Yen or just under $15 USD.

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Sharing this sweet with your friends and family will obviously make that moment memorable and will leave you yearning for more. That is what Japan is known for, producing nothing but the best.

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