Find your inspiration

Salt Making in Vietnam

Making Salt in Vietnam

  • 30
  • 10
  • 2016

When someone mentions Vietnam, do you think of salt? Probably not.

Instead, you’re more likely to think of rice fields. And those rice paddies are a definite draw for tourists, especially tourists who love to take amazing photographs.

But aren’t there other parts of Vietnam that are just as beguiling for would-be photographers as the rice fields. Glad you asked. The salt fields of Vietnam can be just as picturesque as the rice paddies – just in a different way. And according to some people, Vietnamese salt is best in the world.

Salt Making in Vietnam

At first glance, you might think that the white stuff in these images is snow. No, it’s salt.

Local Vietnamese workers in the Nha Trang area of South Vietnam have been making salt for as long as anyone there can remember.

Salt Making in Vietnam

It’s a natural industry because salt is present in high concentrations in many of South Vietnam’s coastal waters. Salt-filled water from the sea is directed inland into shallow fields where the sun evaporates the water and dries the salt.

Salt Making in Vietnam

Raking and collecting salt with wicker baskets starts at 4 am, before the sun is high in the sky, and lasts until 9 am. Even though they don’t work during the heat of midday, workers wear hats to protect themselves from the sun. In addition, they protect themselves from the harsh salt with rubber gloves, rubber boots, and facemasks.

Salt Making in Vietnam

To see the work of salt-making in progress, the best time to visit is March to July. Workers usually speak only their local language, but they are friendly and welcoming.

Salt Making in Vietnam

Share This Story

You Might Like These As Well

Japan might use recycled smartphones to make its 2020 Olympic medals

China’s Feng Shui Circular Skyscraper

Statues of deities Hong Kong

Hong Kong’s Final Resting Place for Discarded Deities

Nissan has built a mobile office inside an electric van

14 things that people who have lived in Hong Kong will definitely know

Facebook Messenger can now tell you what to talk to your friends about

Pay $2 million for a Meal and Receive $17,000 Chopsticks as a Souvenir

K-Pop Academy Heads to Mexico

Get your Hands on India’s Favorite Donut