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This bracelet tracks how much alcohol is in your bloodstream and it’s kind of genius

  • 07
  • 01
  • 2017

Wearables are no longer just for finding out how many steps you’ve taken. Now, companies are coming up with even more inventive ways to exploit the tech. Just take a look at Proof: the wristband that checks your blood alcohol content.

When you’re on a night out, no doubt you’ve wondered from time to time just how near the limit you are. Sure you can keep track of how many drinks you’ve had, but often it’s hard to actually know how this actually translates into your blood alcohol content – which is where Proof comes in.

Proof wristband
(Proof)

Proof has been created by the company Milo Sensors, and its CEO and founder Evan Strenk presented the gadget at CES 2017 in Las Vegas – one of the world’s biggest technology trade shows.

The wristband is paired with an app on your smartphone, which you can preset with your desired alcohol level. When you’ve reached this level you’ll get an alert: as simple as that.

Proof app
(Proof)

Proof claims to be “the first wearable for alcohol” and uses a disposable cartridge system to convert “perspired alcohol into an alcohol level specific to you.”

We don’t know about you, but it sounds a darn sight easier than carrying a breathalyser with you whenever you go for drinks. The band is currently a prototype, but is set to come out sometime this year.

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